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Showing posts from May, 2019

Small Businesses

Sexual harassment can happen anywhere. Whether you’re a Fortune 500 company with thousands of employees or a small startup sharing a co-working space, sexual harassment can and does happen. So what do you do when it happens? For small companies, this answer isn’t always clear, which can encourage a culture of staying silent.

A recent Harvard Business Review article on sexual harassment in small firms identified several characteristics that make small businesses more susceptible to sexual harassment. Most importantly, smaller firms often do not have an HR department, meaning that it’s up to CEOs to manage and oversee workplace behavior. According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 75% of sexual harassment incidents in the workplace go unreported due to fear of retaliation. That fear is a lot greater when the person you have to report sexual harassment to happens to be your boss.
In addition to being more susceptible to sexual harassment, the consequences for workplace p…

The Missing Link in Reporting Workplace Harassment

A nationwide survey launched by Stop Street Harassment to understand why the #MeToo movement gained so much traction has revealed that 81% of women and 43% of men in the United States have experienced some form of sexual harassment in their lives. Approximately 26% of these sexual harassment cases occurred in the victim’s workplace. With one in fiveemployees facing sexual harassment at their place of work, it is clear that it is time to revolutionize the way harassment cases are reported and processed. 

Based on a comprehensive study of harassment in the workplace in 2016, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recommended that companies integrate standardized anti-harassment policies into their company cultures. The EEOC emphasized that the harassment reporting system a company uses is crucial to successfully combating workplace harassment. In the report, the EEOC suggests that companies should have a reporting system that: Allows employees to report misconduct quickly…

Giving a Voice to The Silent Majority

“We’re on the best places to work list!” It’s something employers love to brag about, but one has to wonder whether the lists serve a useful purpose. Workplace rankings can be found all over the web. They’re featured on sites such as Business Insider, Glassdoor, and Forbes, just to name a few.
One of the biggest flaws of those rankings however, is the fact that the human dynamics of an organization can’t be summed up in a single study. In many cases, high-level surveys from outside parties aren’t even going to touch on hard hitting topics that employers prefer to avoid. Think office politics, workplace stress, and even harassment.
Sexual harassment in the workplace isn’t easy to talk about, yet it’s something companies literally can’t afford to ignore. A study found that for every employee harassed in a company, that employer loses out on $22,500 annually in lost productivity.
A taboo within workplaces The common school of thought for employees is that when an individual sees somethin…